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Occupy Dayton Oral History Project

 Collection
Identifier: MS-499

Content Description

This collection is made up entirely of oral history interviews, their transcriptions, and other project paperwork. No other materials accompanied the collection. The interviews detail not only the history of the Dayton Occupy movement, but also the perceived socio-economic issues facing the city and the surrounding Miami Valley currently. In addition, the interviews also discuss the Occupy Movement generally and its future. Each folder in the collection contains the transcript of the interview and the interviewee/interviewer release forms. Preservation copies of the audio interviews can be found in the E-Archive (ms499_e0001), and reference copies (on DVD) of the same content can be found in Box 1. A copy of Mr. Pitzer’s original project proposal, which includes background information about the movement, as well as details about the methodology of the project is also included.

Dates

  • Creation: 2014

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

There are no restrictions on accessing material in this collection.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright restrictions may apply. Unpublished manuscripts are protected by copyright. Permission to publish, quote or reproduce must be secured from the repository and the copyright holder.

Biographical / Historical

The Occupy movement began in New York City in the late summer of 2011. The location for many of the initial Occupy Wall Street demonstrations was the Wall Street financial district’s Zuccotti Park. These demonstrations soon spread throughout the country with Dayton holding its first protest in early October, 2011.

According to Occupy Dayton’s Facebook social media page, the movement started with four people on a “blustery afternoon, October 1st, 2011.” Three days later Occupy had a large weekday rally, followed by its first large Saturday rally. All of these gatherings, or “camps’ as they were called by the movement, were held in Dayton’s Courthouse Square. Occupy Dayton also began having meetings at an old church on 3rd Street. As time passed, the occupiers were asked to move their “camp” to Dave Hall Plaza, a public park, further south along Main St. The city held its annual tree lighting celebration in Courthouse Square and perceived that the Occupy movement, if not a disruption, would prove to be a distraction at the event.

As stated by one of the interviewees, the Occupy Dayton movement splintered somewhat when the city asked them to move to Dave Hall plaza. The issue presented an early riff. According to one of this project’s interviewees, soon after the move to Dave Hall Plaza, the assemblies at the camp began shrinking from the October and November crowds of 150 people to around 20.

At the time of Mr. Pitzer’s interviews during the winter and spring of 2014, the camps that sprang up in public spaces throughout the United States were long gone, and each of the interviewees here addresses the question “is Occupy dead?” The Dayton movement had become fractionalized early on and the interviews in this collection all relate that by December 2012, early 2013, the movement had all but disbanded. That said, they all relate as well that the ideas of the movement still live on and manifest themselves in other methods of civic and social involvement and activism.

Occupy Dayton Oral History Project was a capstone project initiated and completed by Wright State public history student, Kyle Pitzer. Mr. Pitzer interviewed six participants and leaders of the Dayton manifestation of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Kyle R. Pitzer was born March 27, 1990, and died unexpectedly on July 3, 2014, near New Vienna, Ohio, as the result of an automobile accident.

Extent

0.25 linear feet (1 half-size Hollinger box)

11.3 Gigabytes

Language of Materials

English

Abstract

The Occupy Dayton Oral History Project was a graduate capstone project initiated and completed by Wright State graduate student in history, Kyle Pitzer. Mr. Pitzer interviewed six participants and leaders of the Dayton manifestation of the Occupy Wall Street movement which began in New York City in late summer 2011. These demonstrations soon spread throughout the country with Dayton holding its first protest in early October, 2011. Three years later from January to May of 2014, Kyle Pitzer interviewed several of the key players in the Dayton movement.

Arrangement

The collection is arranged alphabetically by interviewee name.

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

The original interviews were created as *.WAV files. Currently, patrons may access these interviews via DVD reference copies; preservation masters are stored in the E-Archives, under ms499_e0001.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

The Occupy Dayton Oral History Project was a graduate capstone project initiated and completed by Wright State graduate student in history, Kyle Pitzer. Upon completion of the project in 2014, Mr. Pitzer donated his interviews to Special Collections and Archives, Wright State University Libraries.

Existence and Location of Copies

All audio and transcript files for this collection are available online in CORE Scholar at: https://corescholar.libraries.wright.edu/special_ms499/. Patrons are requested to use the online version for access.

Processing Information

Processed by Gino Pasi, November 2015

Subject

donor

Title
Guide to the Occupy Dayton Oral History Project (MS-499)
Status
Completed
Author
Gino Pasi, Lisa Rickey
Date
July 13, 2016
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
English

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
Special Collections and Archives
3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy
Dayton OH 45435-0001 USA
937-775-2092